Event Schedule

Wednesday, March 16, 7:15 p.m.
[Cinecenta, Student Union Building]

Film screening and on-stage interview
The Trick with the Gun


Thursday, March 17, 7:30 p.m.
[Rm. A240, Human & Social Development Building]

Landsdowne Lecture by Molly Peacock
Fact, Metaphor, and the Single Voice:
Where Creative Nonfiction Meets Poetry


Friday, March 18, 7:30 p.m.
[Rm. A240, Human & Social Development Building]

Words on Ice: An Evening of Readings


Saturday, March 19, starting at 10:00 a.m.
[Human & Social Development Building]

WordsThaw Panel Discussions

10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Literary Afterlives: Exploring the Meaning and Value of Writers’ Archives

1:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
The Investigative Poet: Observer, Researcher, Analyst

3:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
Creative Nonfiction in Canada Today: Fact, Fiction, or Scandal?

One-on-One Critiques

12:15 pm to 1:15 p.m.
Brief Encounters: One-on-One Critiques of Your Work


Sunday, March 20, 1:30 p.m.
[Greater Victoria Public Library, Downtown Branch]

The Sonnet as a Secret Essay:
Master Class with Molly Peacock

All Master Class tickets are sold out. Please e-mail us to be put on a waiting list.


Event Details


Wednesday, March 16 / Evening
WordsThaw 2016 Opening Event

The Trick with the Gun

7:15 p.m. (run time: 90 minutes, followed by an on-stage interview)
A film co-written by Christopher Gudgeon and Scott Hamell and directed by Michael McNamara
Cinecenta, Student Union Building
$7.75; $6.75 (UVic faculty and staff, Cinemagic members); $5.75 (students and seniors)
Admission is not included in the WordsThaw Pass

How real is real? WHAT HAPPENS WHEN FRIENDS RISK THEIR LIVES – AND FRIENDSHIP – FOR THE SAKE OF A MAGIC TRICK?

The Bullet Catch. Fourteen men and women have died performing the most dangerous illusion in magic. Author Chris Gudgeon and magician Scott Hammell set out to perform the deadly trick in a story about risk and the dance between reality and illusion, and how everything changes when you’re staring down the barrel of a gun. With interviews and performances from Penn & Teller, Bill Kalush, Carl Skenes, Hans Morretti, George Schindler, and others.

Launch WordsThaw by attending the Victoria theatrical premiere of The Trick with the Gun. Join Christopher Gudgeon after the show in conversation with journalist and screenwriter Mark Leiren-Young about the making of the movie and the interplay between fiction and reality in documentary films.

The Trick with the Gun is produced by Markham Street Film in association with Super Channel and Canal D, a division of Bell Media, with the participation of Canada Media Fund, Rogers Telefund, The Canadian Film or Video Production Tax Credit and the Ontario Tax Credit.

Read Michael D. Reid’s Times Colonist review and Addison Wylie’s review on Wylie Writes

Read the event description for The Trick with the Gun on Cinecenta’s website.

This screening is co-organized with

CINECENTAlogo


Thursday, March 17, 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 7:00 pm)
[Rm. A240, Human & Social Development Building]

Landsdowne Lecture by Molly Peacock
Fact, Metaphor, and the Single Voice:
Where Creative Nonfiction Meets Poetry

Admission is free; WordsThaw Pass not required

Sponsored by the Faculty of Humanities

Although the essay seems very much part of worldly thought and communication, and the poem seems very much part of a more rarified, ineffable world, the intuition of the poem and the savoir faire of the essay have much in common.

This is what Molly Peacock has to say about her Lansdowne Lecture:

“When a poem thinks, mulls, considers and meditates upon a subject, it approaches becoming an essay. When an essay uses language to visualize ideas or to make thoughts sing, it approaches the poetic. Facts, the province of nonfiction, enter poems; metaphors and similes, the province of poetry, enter nonfiction. In the essay the voice of the author, whether that be soulful or humorous or journalistic is a constructed persona with a stance toward the world. The single voice both guides creative nonfiction and drives the poem.”

Molly Peacock has published six books of poetry, including The Second Blush and Cornucopia: New and Selected Poems. She inaugurated and serves as the series editor of The Best Canadian Poetry in English. Her works of creative nonfiction include Paradise, Piece By Piece, a memoir about a woman’s choice not to have children, and The Paper Garden: Mrs. Delany Begins Her Life’s Work at 72 , a biography. She is the author of How To Read a Poem & Start a Poetry Circle, the editor of The Private I: Privacy in a Public World, and the co-editor of Poetry in Motion: One Hundred Poems from the Subways and Buses. Her most recent book, Alphabetique: 26 Characteristic Fictions is illustrated by Kara Kosaka. She lives in Toronto.

Copies of Molly Peacock’s books are on sale in the lobby courtesy of the UVic Bookstore.


Friday, March 18, 7:30 p.m. (doors at 7:00 p.m.)
[Rm. A240, Human & Social Development Building]

Words on Ice: An Evening of Readings

WordsThaw pass or Words on Ice ticket required
Regular ticket price (at door only): $10
Student evening ticket price (at door): $5

An evening of readings of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction by nine Canadian writers

M.A.C. Farrant, Stella Harvey, Jeremy Loveday, Elizabeth May, Molly Peacock, Laura Trunkey, Kim Trainor, and J.D. Zapf

Co-hosted by Yvonne Blomer and John Barton

Jeremy Loveday and Kim Trainor’s readings are generously supported by The Canada Council for the Arts

Readers’ books and CDs on sale in the lobby courtesy of the UVic Bookstore
Co-organized with Planet Earth Poetry

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WordsThaw Panel Discussions


Saturday, March 19, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
[Rm. A240, Human & Social Development Building]

Literary Afterlives: Exploring the Meaning and Value of Writers’ Archives

WordsThaw pass or event ticket required

Beyond their published works, an author may be understood and remembered through their archive, which may include correspondence, drafts of writings, diaries, photographs, and increasingly digital documents. The archives of writers can provide insight not only into their life, but also their creative process and intellectual circle. What are the legal and ethical concerns involved when an archive moves from an author’s desk to a cultural heritage institution? How do archives impact an author’s legacy? How are new forms of scholarship transforming interpretation of authors and their works? The panelists will discuss these concerns from the perspective of both writers and scholars.

Panelists: Jan Zwicky, Nicholas Bradley, and Lisa Goddard

Moderator: Heather Dean


Saturday, March 19, 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
[Rm. A240, Human & Social Development Building]

The Investigative Poet: Observer, Researcher, Analyst

WordsThaw pass or event ticket required

What do poets have in common with journalists, academics, scientists and even detectives? They may employ different methods. They may be driven by different motivations. But poets are researchers. Poets are reporters.

Poetry, no matter its form, is driven by a sense of honest inquiry—often urgent inquiry. Aside from such well-known ingredients as observation, contemplation, rhythm, mastery of language, powerful feeling, voice and a way with metaphor, poems are built on facts. But how do the fruits of a poet’s investigations, be they public or personal or both, transform into art? And why strive for this elusive alchemy?

With this panel discussion, we’ll dig for new perspectives on the making of poetry and its role in posing questions relevant and essential to society and humanity.

Can poetry be a catalyst to discovering and expressing not only “what we know,” but “what we want to know”?

Panelists: Kim Trainor, Arleen Paré, and Kyeren Regehr

Moderator: Anita Lahey


Saturday, March 19, 3:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
[Rm. A240, Human & Social Development Building]

Creative Nonfiction in Canada Today:
Fact, Fiction, or Scandal?

WordsThaw pass or event ticket required

Creative nonfiction has expanded in a variety of ways over the past two decades. But what is its status today? Still vying with fiction for attention? Still looking for a way to cohabit with journalism to bring veracity to new levels of excellence? Or has it meandered too far down Memoir Lane, becoming all too predictable? And what’s happening as the increasingly blurred boundary between nonfiction and fiction gives the genre new legs, and a wealth of diverse pathways to explore?

Come to the Malahat’s panel for possible answers — and many other questions..

Panelists: Lynne Van Luven, Christopher Gudgeon, and Frances Backhouse

Moderator: Alisa Gordaneer


Saturday, March 19, 12:15 pm to 1:15 p.m.
[Human & Social Development Building]

Brief Encounters: One-on-One Critiques of Your Work

Get your work critiqued by local writers during 15-minute blue-pencil sessions!

How do I sign up? First, you must have bought a full WordsThaw pass! Choose one of the six authors listed below to critique your work (each author’s respective genres is in parentheses beside his/her name). Send us an email at malahat@uvic.ca indicating the author/genre of your choosing. Once we confirm that s/he is available, be sure to send us your work for critiquing before March 15 to give the author enough time to workshop your piece.

How long should my work be? Prose should be no more than 750 words long. Poetry and graphic novel works should be no longer than a page long.

Each author will conduct four 15-minute sessions. First-come, first served!

Brief Encounters is included in the cost of a WordsThaw 2016 Pass, but anyone interested must have signed up for a consultation by March 15.

All Brief Encounter spots have now been filled =)

Writers include Stephanie Harrington (nonfiction), Annabel Howard (nonfiction), Keith Jones (comics), Troy Sebastian (poetry), Melanie Siebert (poetry), and Katherine Wagner (fiction).


Sunday, March 20, 1:30 p.m.
[Greater Victoria Public Library, Downtown Branch]

The Sonnet as a Secret Essay:
Master Class with Molly Peacock

All Master Class tickets are sold out. Please e-mail us to be put on a waiting list.

Often buried in the magic proportion of the sonnet is the surprise of an idea that is like a mini-essay. This Master Class, designed for those who have never written a sonnet in their lives as well as for those who have written many at a sophisticated level, will tease out how emotions and experiences underpin ideas in this fascinating, ever-renewing fourteen-line structure. Sound plays a great role here, and it influences how the octave, the first eight lines, and the sestet, the last six lines, can put forth an idea, then upset it, or even establish a thesis and enumerate examples. We will examine a small variety of English, Canadian and American sonnets, from the 16th to the 21st century, to discover how the sonnet can perform as a secret essay. Just for starters: It’s strange to think of George Herbert as a creative nonfiction writer in disguise, but there are seeds of essay ideas in his sonnet “Prayer.” Other sonnets will be brought forth as models, and we will have a chance to make a sonnet studio, attempting them after we examine the models. Motto: in the attempt is the success.

Molly Peacock is a widely anthologized poet and biographer, the author of the best-selling The Paper Garden: Mrs. Delany Begins Her Life’s Work at 72, The Second Blush (poems) and Alphabetique: 26 Characteristic Fictions. She is the series editor of The Best Canadian Poetry in English. She lives in Toronto.

Organized by Planet Earth Poetry

Event Partner:

Greater Victoria Public Library

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